Japanese Culture and Japanese gifts ( Hanko, Japanese Traditional Clothing and Accessories ) ③ - A Gift From Japan

We have a special event that is called Setsubun on February 3rd.

Today, Setsubun indicates the eve of the first day of spring by the old calendar, which is the end of a year.
Setsubun is usually the day before the arrival of spring and it is the last day of winter.

In the past, people believed that oni (demon) come when the seasons change in Japan.

 

 

 

It was necessary to dispel negative things and evil spirits that bring about various plagues before the start of a new season.

The roasted beans used for Setsubun are called “Fukuyama,” which are said to be very effective against evil spirits.

In order to instill god’s power in the beans, they are to be offered/placed on the household altar until Setsubun.

Scattering beans is a purification ritual for starting the new year.
Throwing soybeans represents getting rid of bad luck and welcoming good fortune.
On Setsubun days, people throw away beans with saying “Oni wa soto, fuku wa uchi.”

Throwing beans is called “Mamemaki” in Japanese. Mame means “beans,” maki means “scattering.”

“Oni wa soto, fuku wa uchi” means “Demon be gone, happiness comes in.”
In Japanese, the word “oni” means evil spirit or demon, “fuku” means luck and good fortune.
People scatter roasted beans both inside and outside of their houses.

・Demons out! Happiness in!
・Demons out! Luck comes in!
・Out with the demon! In with the happiness!
・Devils are outside! Luck is inside!

 

 

It’s common at festivals for someone to dress up as aka oni (red devil or ogre) .

Some of the little kids get scared and cry when Oni comes in.

After the beans are thrown, gather them all up and eat as same beans as your age.

It is said that you will be healthy for the whole year by eating the number of beans as your age and plus one more bean.

In western Japan, there is also a custom to hang a “hiiragi-iwashi” (holly branches and a grilled sardine) on the door in order to prevent the demon from entering the house.

Why don’t you wear Yukata, Samue Jinbei or half coat ( Hanten ) ?

https://name-stamp.com

 

 

Why don’t you stop by this temple Ukimi-do with wearing Yukata, Jinbei, Samue, or half coat ( Hanten ) ?

name-stamp.com

IN NY and London, wearing Japanese traditional clothing ( Samue, Jinbei, Yukata, and so on )which become a boom now.

 

 

 

Male model  : 184 cm

Wearing size : LL

Wearing pattern : 976-17n

Cotton 100%   Made in Japan

This can be washed in the washing machine.

This texture is similar to a cotton T-shirt.

 

 

 

Samue is loose fitting and it’s comfortable for every body shape. 

IN NY and London, wearing Japanese traditional clothing ( Samue, Jinbei, Yukata, and so on )which become a boom now.

Male model  : 184 cm

Wearing size : L

Wearing pattern : Denim Samue for men

This can be washed in the washing machine.

This texture is similar to jeans

 

 

 

 

 

This can be washed in the washing machine.

This texture is similar to jeans.

 

 

 

 

Wearing pattern : traditional Samue dark blue for men

Cotton 100%   Made in Japan

This can be washed in the washing machine.

This texture is similar to a cotton T-shirt.

 

 

 

 
Jinbei is loose fitting and it’s comfortable for every body shape