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The best Japanese gifts Hanko ( Japanese name stamp ) 

 

What is Hanko ( Name stamp )

In Japan, instead of signing things we stamp our Hanko ( Name stamp ). Hanko is also called “Inkan”. We use them when we want to open a bank account, buy a house, rent something, or sign an important contract. It’s considered a form of ID in Japan.

Hanko is a part of Japanese society and it’s a very important part.

If you should ever come to Japan, you’ll need one for your own bank account or to rent a home, they’re very important here.

 

 

 

How to stamp Hanko ( Name stamp )

Japanese people use their Hanko all the time. When you write letters, you use your Hanko instead of signing your name. you also stamp it on various other things you carry around just to give it a personal accent.

Hanko makes great souvenirs and presents. You can have your name written in Kanji, Katakana, Hiragana or English characters on your Hanko.

 

There are 2 types of Hanko, one of them is round one that’s called Maruin and another one is Square Hanko that’s called Kakuin in Japanese.

 

These are Maruin.

 

This is Marianna by Kanji

 

This is Francesco by Katakana charactor.

 

Maruin has 3 types of Hanko below.

Jitsuin

A jitsu-in (literally meaning “actual/true seal”) is the one you would use when signing a contract. If you’re a freelancer and you need to sign a contract with a company, you need a jitsu-in. The same goes for other situations like setting up a company or buying a house. For the jitsu-in to have legal standing, you must register it at your city office. After you’ve registered it, they’ll also issue you with a “inkan card” which will allow you to print certificates of seal registration. When signing an important contract, you’ll often need to impress your seal and provide the certificate to prove that it’s your inkan and that it’s registered.

 

Ginkoin

A ginko-in is simply a hanko for financial transactions. Instead of registering it with your city office, you just register it with your bank(s). It can be used to withdraw money from your account or sign up for a loan, so you should look after it. While Japanese patrons are typically required to register a ginko-in when they open a bank account, most banks don’t require it of foreign customers. One big exception is when you start a company. Since a company isn’t a real person and can’t sign anything, you need to register a ginko-in when you open an account.

 

Mitomein

A mitome-in is your regular, everyday hanko which you use for everyday things—like receiving parcels or for stamping on an invoice if you are a freelancer. The mitome-in is not registered anywhere and has no legal standing.

Some people use the same inkan for all three different purposes, but given that the jitsu-in is equivalent to your signature, and it can be easily copied, the less you use it the better. Also, for almost any situation where a mitome-in is needed, a simple signature will suffice.

 

 

These are Kakuin

This is Emma by Kanji

 

When you do Shodo or do fishing  you stamp Kakuin instead of sighing things or under your sign or ilike them below.

 

書道の印・サイズとデザインの見かた選び方 | 書家 佐藤雅嵐 公式サイト | 東京銀座アート書道教室

 

 

Would you like to make your original Hanko ( name stamp )?

Please make line drawing

( portrait, words, name, and so on ) in BMP jpg png and send it to us.

Our collections

 

https://name-stamp.com/hanko-inkan/hankoinkan

 

 

 
 
In NY and London Japanese traditional clothing, the accessory has become a boom.

 

This can be washed in the washing machine.
This texture is similar to a cotton T-shirt.

 

Would you like to try Jinbei?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cotton 100%  

This can be washed in the washing machine.

This texture is similar to jeans.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cotton 100%  Made in Japan

This can be washed i in the washing machine.

This texture is similar to a cotton T-shirt.

Would you like to try Samue?

 

 

 

 

 

In NY and London Japanese traditional clothing, the accessory has become a boom.

 

 

Cotton shantung   Made in Japan

This can be washed in the washing machine.

This texture is similar to a cotton T-shirt.

 

 

 

 

Cotton 100%  Made in Japan

This should not be washed in the washing machine.

It is better to wash it with your hand.

This texture is similar to a cotton T-shirt.

 

Would you like to try Japanese traditional half coat?

 

 

 

 

In NY and London Japanese traditional clothing, the accessory has become a boom.
This can be washed in the washing machine.
This texture is similar to a cotton T-shirt.
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

Cotton 100%   Made in Japan

This can be washed in the washing machine.
This texture is similar to a cotton T-shirt.
 

Would you like to try Yukata?

 

 

 

 

Furoshiki is a traditional Japanese square cloth, for wrapping items, such as gifts and presents, or transporting them. It’s also usable as it is, as tablecloth, sofa decoration etc., or can be folded and tied to create fashionable eco-bags. Versatile, convenient and reusable, this Japanese ancient tradition perfectly matches nowadays needs for a more ecologic and waste-free way of creating bags and wrappings.
In this video, you will find simple instructions on how to tie a Furoshiki to create a bag or a wine bottle case.

In NY and London Japanese traditional clothing, the accessory has become a boom.
This can be washed in the washing machine.

 

Furoshiki size 108 cm × 108 cm 

Cotton 100%   Made in Japan

This can be washed in the washing machine.

This texture is similar to a cotton T-shirt.

 

 

Furoshiki size 108 cm × 108 cm

Cotton 100%  Made in Japan

This can be washed in the washing machine.

This texture is similar to a cotton T-shirt.

 

 

 

 

 

Furoshiki size :118 cm × 118 cm

Cotton 100%  Made in Japan

This can be washed in the washing machine.

This texture is similar to a cotton T-shirt.

 

 

 

 

Furoshiki size : 118 cm × 118 cm

Cotton 100%   Made in Japan

This can be washed in the washing machine.

This texture is similar to a cotton T-shirt.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Would you like to use Furoshiki ?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hagire are traditional Kimono fabric scraps, collected and sewn together to create many different objects as in Patchwork crafts. Since Hagire are leftovers of the fabric used to sew Kimono, and not industrially produced, their color and pattern may vary from the picture, depending on the season and ordering time. Every order will be a surprise! 

In NY and London Japanese traditional clothing, the accessory has become a boom.
This can be washed in the washing machine.

Cotton 100 %          Made in Japan

This can be washed in the washing machine.

This texture is similar to a cotton T-shirt.

 

Would you like to do patchwork with Kimono scraps?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Japanese traditional silk scarf size : 78 cm × 78 cm

Silk 100%   Made in Japan

This can not be washed in the washing machine, please wash it with your hands.

This texture is smooth.

 

Would you like to try Japanese traditional accessories?

 

 

 

 

https://name-stamp.com/hanko-inkan/senja-fuda

The best Japanese traditional gift ( Japanese traditional business card that is called Senjafuda )

Senjafuda are slips or cards with the bearer’s name printed on them.
They were originally votive placards made of wood,

but since the Edo period they have been made of paper like this Washi and

people used to post them inside temples and shrines, as a memory of their visit.

In Kyoto, Maiko and Geisha began to use colorful and patterned Senjafuda

as their buisness card, that were called Hanameishi ( literally “flower buisness card ).
Also you can put your email address, URL and so on on the side of Senjafuda too.

 

A gift from Japan  name-stamp.com

You can make your cool Senjafuda on A gift from Japan.

 

 

You can compare an image of Hiragana with an image of Katakana or

an image of English with an image of Kanji and so on before your order is 

 

CATHERINE’s Senjafuda in Katakana

                                                       ↓

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CATHERINE’s Senjafuda in Kanji

 

                                             

 

 

 

 

 

ERIC’s Senjafuda in Katakana

      ↓

 

ERIC’s Senjafuda in Hiragana

      ↓

 

 

Would you like to make your original Senjafuda ?

https://name-stamp.com/hanko-inkan/senja-fuda

 

 

The origin of Ise shrine where is the most famous shrine in Japan

I could know the origin of Ise shrine in Omi Hachiman Shiga next to Kyoto. Every Japanese wants to go to ISE shrine while you are alive. But I found this shrine is the origin of Ise shrine. there is the highest-ranking god here in Japan that god is called AmenominakannushinoKami. So You will get super big power here you've never had got. The highest-ranking god is in AmenominakannushinoKami shrine and the Second god is in Taga shrine in Shiga next to Kyoto then the third god is in Ise shrine in Mie prefecture which is the most famous shrine in Japan. So after I stopped by here, I went to Taga shrine, It took 1 hour from menominakannushinoKami shrine to Taga shrine by car. I will introduce the Taga shrine in the next blog. I passed through the gate, and there is an approach to a shrine ( long way ) that is called Sando in Japanese, then you can see steps, a black horse and a big forest. Why horse is in a lot of shrines? Because God rides a horse and it is said God m...more >>

Heian shrine

I went to a very old shrine in Kyoto which is very famous in Japan and is called Heian shrine. When you go there, there is a very beautiful river and ket you feel nostargic. This is Heian shirne. A lot of people were praying. In 1895, the Japanese industrial exhibition was held in Okazaki as the 1100th anniversary of Heian Kyo, the ancient Kyoto city. As a monument of the exhibition, Heian Jingu shrine was built as a Shinto shrine that enshrines emperor Kannmu who moved the Japanese capital from Nara to Kyoto. The buildings are 5/8 scale reproductions of Chodoin buildings in Heian-Kyo. In the Japanese Imperial year 2600 (1940 A.D.), emperor Komei was also enshrined there. He is the last emperor who spent his life in Kyoto. In 1976, an arson set a fire to the shrine, and 9 buildings were burnt out. Fortunately, the main hall has escaped the fire narrowly. After the incident, people all around Japan made donations,s and Heian Jingu we see today was reconstruc...more >>

The super spiritual area ” Seimei shrine ” in Kyoto Japan

I went to the Seimei shrine which is very famous that is the super-spiritual area in Kyoto Japan. Seimei Shrine is a shrine dedicated to Seimei Abe in Kamigyo Ward, Kyoto City. Seimei Abe is said to have been the ancestor and astronomer of the Abe clan, who oversaw the Onmyodo dormitory. The shrine dedicated to Seimei Abe, also known as the Onmyoji in modern times, is popular as a power spot that benefits from disasters and illnesses. The skater, Yuzuru Hani, came to worship and won the gold medal at the Olympic Games, which has attracted more attention. This time, we will introduce how to enjoy Seimei Shrine along with many attractions such as peaches and wells in the precincts. The mark of this star is called "burdock star", and Seimei Abe was used for the Onmyodo. Seimei Abe used this star mark as a talisman. Seimei Shrine is a moderately sized shrine facing Horikawa-dori. In the precincts, there are many shrines related to Seimei, such as the statue of Seimei...more >>

If you want to remove the bad luck, Go to here wearing Yukata

I stopped by the Ichihime shrine only for women coincidentally. The year when any women have to remove bad luck, they go to pray there in those years. Those years are called Yakudoshi in Japanese. Yakudoshi, which literally means “unlucky age,”refers toparticular ages when a number of disasters are believed to strike. For men, these ages are 25, 42, and 61, and for women, 19, 33, and 37, usingthe traditional Japanese way of counting age, where newborn babies are considered to be one year old at birth. In particular, 42 for men and 33 for women are said to be the unluckiest ages, when one may experience the worst misfortune. In addition, the years before and after one’s unlucky age are called Maeyaku and Atoyakurespectively. You need to be careful of illness or accidents during both Yakudoshi and in the year before and after. People in Yakudoshi often visit a shrine for Yakubarai, which means to “remove the bad luck.” There is a shrine for women to remove the bad luck. The shri...more >>

Japanese traditional Long epic song that is called NAGAUTA 

I went to see my friend who sings long epic songs that is called NAGAUTA in the hall Kyoto Japan. I saw a lot of people who wore kimono also I saw a lot of Geisha too. A nagauta (long epic songwith shamisen accompaniment) derived from Otsu-e, and finally, also a number in Classical Japanese dance.  This is a Japanese traditional curtain, These Sakura ( cherry blossoms ) patterns of the curtain are very beautiful. A lot of Geisha who wearing Kimono came to see Nga-Uta. it is hard to wear Kimono but easy to wear Yukata or Samue which is like a bathrobe. So when you go to see any Japanese traditional events, why don't you go wearing Yukata or Samue? The most widely known symbol of Japanese traditional Summer outfits, Yukata are light and simple long robes, similar to Kimono in their shape but much more informal and easy to wear. They are usually worn during Japanese Summer events such as Matsuri or Fireworks Festivals. Female model: 165 cm Wearing size...more >>

This shrine for your business is going very very good

I like going to the Ebisu shrine for prosperous business because I am the owner of an online shop for Japanese traditional stuff. And I go to the Ebisu shrine on the way, I pass Miyagawa street, Miyagawa street looks like Edo era, and there are a lot of Ozashiki restaurants which means when you have a dinner and drink, Maiko's performance and Geisha play music and sing songs, also, you can play some games with Maiko. About Ozashiki with Maiko, Maiko is mainly in charge of dancing at Ozashiki and performs the dancing of Kyomai Inoue school in Gion Kobu district and other dancing such as the Wakayagi school in other districts. At Ozashiki and on the stage both geisha and Maiko are heavily-powdered with Shironuri (white makeup), but while a geisha usually wears a wig, Maiko dresses her hair in traditional Japanese style and wears a gorgeous ornate hairpin, Tsumami-kanzashi (a decorative hairpin) featuring something like flowers of each season. At Ozashiki Asobi, customers can enj...more >>

Kamigami shrine where is oldest shrine in Kyoto Japan 

I walked to see the arch of cherry blossom when I went to the Kamigamo shrine on the way. this arch is very very famous in Kyoto Japan. They looked like the tunnel of cherry blossom. Kamo river is also very famous in Kyoto Japan along side with the arch. After you passed the arch, passed, you can see the Kamigamo shrine. There are a lot of beautiful cherry blossoms in the Kamigamo shrine. About Kamigamo shrine, Kamo-wake-ikazuchi-Jinja in the Kita Ward of Kyoto is the oldest Shinto shrine in the ancient city. Since prehistoric times Kamigamo-jinja has preserved and transmitted the legends relating to the birth of the shrine deity, Wakeikazuchi. Ancient rituals which transmit the faith in the divine mountains, Kamo Sai also known as Aoi Matsuri which started during the reign of Emperor Kinmei in 544, and the shrine buildings retaining the style of the early Heian Period, all convey the history of the province of Yamashiro (southern Kyoto Prefecture). Most of the...more >>

Cherry-blossom viewing in Kyoto

I went to KAMOGAWA river to have a party under the cherry blossom trees that are called HANAMI in Japanese alongside KAMOGAWA river in Kyoto Japan. We found a cherry blossom beautiful arch and we had a party here. We brought alcohol and snacks and had a good time with my friends. Hanami” is a Japanese tradition of welcoming spring. The literal meaning is “viewing flowers” and Enjoying cherry blossoms is an old Japanese custom (that’s been around for over 1000 years). Hanami is like a picnic to enjoy the cherry blossoms. People get together under the cherry blossoms and enjoy food and drinks. Many people go early in the morning to secure a spot. Cherry blossoms only bloom for a short time, usually for only a week or two. Cherry blossoms remind people that life is short and beautiful. The sunset with cherry blossoms was very beautiful. I saw a lot of people who were wearing Yukata or JInbei Why don7t you try them when you join event...more >>

Traveling to Mt.Fuji and kamakura city 2nd day

I took a photo with taking Onsen outside in the Ryokan in the morning, Onsen outside is called ROTEN-BURO. Mt.Fuji was very huge and a white cloud was moving on the top. we felt kinda scared too. We went to Kamakura is a coastal town in Kanagawa Prefecture, less than an hour south of Tokyo after checked out our Ryokan. Kamakura became the political center of Japan when Minamoto Yoritomo chose the city as the seat for his new military government in 1192. The Kamakura government continued to rule Japan for over a century, first under the Minamoto shogun and then under the Hojo regents. Kamakura is a small city and a very popular tourist destination. Sometimes called the Kyoto of Eastern Japan, Kamakura offers numerous temples, shrines, and other historical monuments. In addition, Kamakura's sand beaches attract large crowds during the summer months. This is the very famous market that is called Komachi-Dori ( Komachi street ) near Kamakura station. A lot of people w...more >>

Traveling to Mt.Fuji and Onsen& Ryokan 1st day

We stayed Japanese traditional hotel that is called Ryokan near Kawaguchi lake in Yamanashi prefecture Japan. We arrived near our Ryokan, Huge Mt.Fuji came up. The hotel we stayed in SHUHOUKAKU KOGETSU where you can enjoy the view of Kawaguchiko and the magnificent Mt.Fuji. I took Mtr.Fuji from my room. You can view Lake Kawaguchi and Mt.Fuji from your room also view them from spa ( Onsen ) This lake ( Kawaguchi lake ) is very famous, I took Mt.Fuji from the private beach of this hotel too. Mt,Fuji is the highest mountain in Japan. It is 3776 meters above sea level and has a diameter of 44 kilometers. Mt Fuji is an active volcano which is located between Yamanashi and Shizuoka prefectures. In June of 2013, Mt. Fuji was registered as a World Heritage site. Mt. Fuji is a stratovolcano and has erupted several times. Mt. Fuji is considered to be the symbol of Japanese beauty and is often drawn ...more >>

This temple is very big and old near Kyoto station ( NIshi Honganji ) 

I walked near Kyoto station in 16th Feb, I stopped by Higashi Honganji where is the biggest temple in Japan. Nishi Honganji and Higashi Honganji in Kyoto are the two head temples of the Jodo-Shin Sect, one of Japan’s largest Buddhist sects. Nishi Honganji, designated as a World Cultural Heritage site, boasts several surviving masterpieces of architecture from the Azuchi-Momoyama and early Edo periods, including the Karamon (National Treasure of Japan), a four-legged gate with Karahafu gables of undulating curves on the front and back. Higashi Honganji, built eleven years after Nishi Honganji, boasts the Goeido, Kyoto’s largest wooden building dedicated to the sect’s founder Shinran, and Shoseien, a small beautiful Japanese strolling-style garden with a pond. This is plum tree in the garden of this temple. This is called Toro ( a garden lantern ) is a kind of traditional Japanese lighting fixture. this Toro is very big, this theight is a...more >>

Very delicious Gyoza in old area in Gion Kyoto 

I went to a very popular GYOZA restaurant that is called HOHEI in GIon Kyoto Japan. I had a long line to enter there. Unluckily, I did not see Maiko at this time, because that is very famous among Maiko too. Gion is a district of Kyoto like this photo below. About Gion Japan, originally developed in the Middle Ages, in front of Yasaka Shrine. The district was built to accommodate the needs of travelers and visitors to the shrine. When you come to GIon area why don't you wear Yukata? Please check gorgeous and cute Yukata in our shop? https://name-stamp.com/japanese-gift/yukata-japanese-traditional-clothing It eventually evolved to become one of the most exclusive and well-known geisha districts in all of Japan. The geisha in the Gion district (and Kyoto generally) do not refer to themselves as geisha; instead, Gion geisha use the local term geiko. While the term geisha means "artist" or "person of the arts", the more direct term geiko mea...more >>

The biggest shrine in Shiga next to Kyoto Japan 

I went to the biggest Shrine in Shiga prefecture Japan. Oumi Jingu is enshrined in the site of Capital Otsu ”Otsukyo”.  Emperor Tenji was the great accomplisher of Taika Reformation and the great establisher in ancient Japan. After His demise, also, people worshipped particularly as the Shinto God. In the Meiji Era, the believers began the movement to build the Emperor's Shrine all over Japan. At last, in Nov.7,1940 (15th year of the Showa Era), the Shrine was completed here, site of Capital Otsu, near the site of old His Palace "Oumi-Otsu-no-Miya". Soon afterward, the shrine was raised to "Chokusai-sha". Annual Great Festival is celebrated in April 20, on the occasion of a visit by a specially dispatched imperial messenger. Achievements of Emperor Tenji  Founder of Omi Statute (the first statute), the first census register, a statesman of socialization to land and people, founder of the first national school, inventor of Water Clock "Rokoku", a phil...more >>

The girls day in March 3rd in Japan

We have the doll festival that is called Hina Matsuri on March 3 also that is called girls day too. It's the day to pray for healthy growth and happiness for young girls. Most families with girls display dolls called Hina-Ningyo. Long ago, people threw paper dolls into rivers and in the sea to drive away evil spirits with them. People began displaying dolls in the Edo period. The dolls depict the imperial court. They are dressed in beautiful ancient court costumes. The Emperor and the Empress have sat on the top. The Emperor The Empress And three court ladies have sat on the second. The folding screen that's called Byoubu Paper lamp that's called Bonjiri Mandarin orange tree Cherry tree In the emperor's house Kyoto Japan, There is always a mandarin orange tree on the emperor's left side and cherry blossoms on his right side. Furniture and household goods that are ...more >>

A temple on the biggest lake in Shiga Japan. Samue, Jinbei, Yukata – A gift from Japan

Ukimi-do is a Buddhist temple of the Kaimonzan Mangetsu-ji Temple, which belongs to the Rinzai sect Daitokuji school, and it is located on a pier extending out into Lake Biwa at katana, Otsu City, Shiga Prefecture. There is a very big pine tree. This tree trunk is very thick, that was planted more than 600 years ago. I went to my friends here. My friends were surprised at this temple on the Biwa lake in Shiga Japan. Why don't you stop by this temple Ukimi-do with wearing Yukata, Jinbei, Samue, or half coat ( Hanten ) ? name-stamp.com The most widely known symbol of Japanese traditional Summer outfit, Yukata are light and simple long robes, similar to Kimono in their shape but much more informal and easy to wear. They are usually worn during Japanese Summer events such as Matsuri or Fireworks Festivals. IN NY and London, wearing Japanese traditional clothing ( Samue, Jinbei, Yukata, and so on )which become a boom now. Female model : 165 cm Wearing siz...more >>

This is very famous temple near Kyoto station ( Toji )

I went to one very famous temple in Kyoto that is called Toji. Toji, or the Kyöö Gokokuji, is a monastery-temple which was founded in 796 under Emperor Kammu’s order and is associated with Kūkai, the renowned Buddhist priest in the Heian period, Kūkai was honored with this imposing temple by Emperor Saga in 823. This temple boasts Japan’s tallest five-storied wooden pagoda, which is the most time-honored landmark in Kyoto. In addition to its impressive array of buildings, Toji possesses an extraordinary collection of Buddhist art, such as sculptures, mandalas, and implements used in esoteric rituals, which demonstrates that Toji was the center of Shingon practice in Kyoto. This is Japan’s tallest five-storied wooden pagoda. There are other temples in Toji There is a long gate and a big fence in Toji. On the 21st of every month a "Kobo Market" is opened in honor of Kobo Daishi, and it has the atmosphere of a temple festival. Also, I've taken p...more >>

This is very old and big temple near Kyoto station ( Higashi Honganji ) 

I walked near Kyoto station in 2nd Feb, I stopped by Higashi Honganji where is the biggest temple in Japan. You can see the temple and Kyoto tower at the same time, The contrast between Kyoto tower and Kyoto station ( modern construction ) and the very old temple is very good. Also, you can see some carps in the temple's moat that is called Ohori in Japanese. And there are colorful carps that are called Nishikigoi in Japanese. They are very beautiful. Nishi Honganji and Higashi Honganji in Kyoto are the two head temples of the Jodo-Shin Sect, one of Japan’s largest Buddhist sects. Nishi Honganji, designated as a World Cultural Heritage site, boasts several surviving masterpieces of architecture from the Azuchi-Momoyama and early Edo periods, including the Karamon (National Treasure of Japan), a four-legged gate with Karahafu gables of undulating curves on the front and back. Higashi Honganji, built eleven years after Nishi Honganji, boasts the Goeido, Kyoto’s large...more >>

Demon comes in Feb 3rd Japan that is called Setsubun Event

We have a special event that is called Setsubun on February 3rd. Today, Setsubun indicatesthe eve of the first day of spring by the old calendar, which is the end of a year. Setsubun isusuallythe day before the arrival of spring and it is the last day of winter. In the past, peoplebelieved that oni (demon) come when the seasons change in Japan. It was necessary todispel negative things and evil spirits that bring about various plagues before the start of a new season. The roasted beans used for Setsubun are called “Fukuyama,” which are said to be very effective against evil spirits. In order toinstill god’s power in the beans, they are to be offered/placed on the household altar until Setsubun. Scattering beans is apurification ritual for starting the new year. Throwing soybeans represents getting rid of bad luck andwelcominggood fortune. On Setsubun days, people throw away beanswith saying“Oni wa soto, fuku wa uchi.” Throwing beans is called “Mamemaki” in Japanese....more >>

Coming-of-Age Ceremony that is called SEIJINSHIKI in Japanese is held annually on the second Monday of January.

I walked the lake in Shiga prefecture, Shiga has the biggest lake in Japan and some mountain ranges, since the end of new year eve, a lot of snow had come in Japan, so as you see these photos, beautiful snow mountain ranges And also there is a very beautiful flower field, those contrasts of snow mountain ranges, beautiful, Biwa lake and flower field are amazing. Besides, I found beautiful women who are wearing gorgeous kimonos also, those contrasts of beautiful sceneries and Kimono girls are very beautiful too. By the way, In Japan, people are considered adults at the age of 20. They are allowed to drink, smoke, and gamble. They can also have contracts for monthly subscription services without getting parental consent. As 'Coming-of-Age Ceremony that is called SEIJINSHIKI in Japanese is held annually on the second Monday of January. The ceremony is a ritual to celebrate all those who become 20 in the year and help them become aware of responsibilities as adults. Seij...more >>

Japan has a great event In Jan 1st

We eat Ozoni in the morning on 1st Jan. About Ozoni, Mochi is eaten to celebrate good health and long life. We eat Mochi in an Ozoni soup celebrating Japanese New Year. There are vegetables and mushrooms and so on all you want and Mochi in the Ozoni soup And we eat Osechi from 1st to 3rd Jan. Osechi is the traditional meal only prepared for New Year. All of the Ingredients in Osechi are well-meaning because Osechi is eaten to pray for good health and great harvest for a year. Also, we visit our favorite shrines or temples that are the first visit in that year that are called Hatsumode. Hatsumode means the first visiting in that year. I went to Tachiki shrines near my house on 1st Jan. When you come to any shrines or temples, you have to wash your hands at Chozuya first. First of all, wash your left hand then wash your right hand and put water on your left hand, wash inside the mouth with that water on the lef...more >>